Kickstarter’s increasingly impressive track record has been on display at film festivals such as Sundance and South by Southwest, but films (though the largest category) aren’t all the crowdfunding website is about. Everything from iPod accessory design to clothing pitches can benefit from the site, including the often-forgotten endeavors of classical musicians.

Co-founder Yancey Strickler recently stated that the funding platform would provide American arts with more funding than the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) this year. While The Information Diet’s Clay Johnson contends that the NEA is meant to fund what’s culturally worthwhile rather than what’s popular, plenty of classical music-related causes have launched Kickstarter projects that exceeded expectation.

Yancey also said:

The lack of support for creative projects led us to start Kickstarter in the first place, and we’re committed to helping to grow the pie of available funding in whatever way that we can. We would happily be a distant second, third, fourth, or fiftieth in arts funding if it meant more of it was available.

Regardless of how it fares against other funding sources for the arts, Kickstarter and similar sites are giving artists of every background tools to help them carve their own path as they bring their projects into reality.

Johanna Maria Rose of Anonymous 4, a program that combines the music of German composer Heinrich Schütz with new music by British composer Ivan Moody, along with the Kronos Quartet, have recently launched projects on the site. The Kronos Quartet commissions music from composers under the age of 30.

String quartet Brooklyn Rider raised over $50,000 from fans when attempting to fulfill a $30,000 bid to fund their latest album. Nonprofit project Musopen, which aims to create and provide copyright-free records, scores and other materials for the music of famous composers, racked up $68,000 when aiming for $11,000.

Have you ever funded a creative project on the Internet? Share your experience with us!

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